How To Find Some Common Sense

In a world where little actually makes any common sense

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By Ketut Subiyanto pexels-photo- Creative Commons

If you have a lot of drama in your life, there is a chance it has come about because of the poor choices you have made along the way. In other words, at the time at least, you lacked the common sense that was needed at that time and in that situation.

One of the greatest expressions of self-love in life is using common sense.

It is through the act of wise self-love, that we seek to be more efficient, effective, precise, productive, and more self-aware.

Within the Wisdom Path, a training center for practical philosophers where I teach, there is a recognition that to rigidly place knowledge upon something uncertain, and irrational is a mistake. This presents great difficulty when attempting to teach a person who makes many poor decisions, common sense.

One need only explore the research and ideas of Ernst Waldfried Josef Wenzel Mach (February 18, 1838 — February 19, 1916), Kurt Friedrich Gödel (April 28, 1906 — January 14, 1978), Richard P. Feynman (1918–1988), John Cunningham Lilly (January 6, 1915 — September 30, 2001) Douglas Richard Hofstadter (born February 15, 1945), Fritjof Capra (b. February 1, 1939) or my friend who headed the team that produced the first “soft” moon landing, Orest Bedrij (b 1933).

The reality in the short term is that at times common sense will be a reflection of intuition combined with intellect and mathematical rigor and at other times quantum thought will show us that common sense is a reflection of the massive “gray area” that we can define best as the mathematical logic of ambiguity, contradiction, and paradox.

It is truly a waste of time to confer a universally technical philosophical value of common sense when dealing with people motivated by emotional agendas, confirmation, and information biases that muddy clarity concerning any person, place, thing, or concept.

For some, common sense is a sort of unjustified and unjustifiable instinct; for others, it is a path of and reason. Each has its limitations. The claim of intuitive knowledge as the source of “common sense” can lead to lazy, uncritical thinking. On the other hand worshipping at the altar of intellect and logic can result in common sense being suppressed as a specifically distinct faculty of knowledge. In either perspective, we may be led to make poor choices. In the end, we lose.

The truth is that when dealing with external world logic and rationalism, we must learn to integrate what we experience from the external world and filter it through the “tacit knowing” that reflects our inner world. This can then be applied in ordinary life as common sense.

As you are reading this right now, many important thinkers in the world of artificial intelligence are seeking to harness mathematical logic and to derive answers to questions expressed in logical form. They seek to do this as a reflection of some type of “common sense.” On one level they are likely to be successful. In the end, they will codify isolate a certain type of common sense that will be useful in certain situations.

One of these projects is The Open Mind Common Sense Project, a collaborative online project. The result of this is Wikipedia, which depends on the contributions of thousands of individuals across the World Wide Web.

I’m the author: I am a game theorist and a teacher on peak performance. I am also a results-oriented self-improvement coach offering advice for innovators of all levels.

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By Lewis

I am always exploring trends, innovations, areas of interest, and solutions to build new stories upon. Again, if you have any ideas you would like me to write about just email me at LewisCoaches@gmail.com

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I offer advice on the arts, innovation, self-improvement, life lessons, mental health, game theory strategies, and love. LewisCoaches.Medium.com

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